1. Book recommendation: The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson–it’s about the Great Migration, the movement of millions of African Americans from the South to the North during the 1900s-1970s, as told through the stories of three people and their families. Thorough research, excellent workmanlike prose, and a deep respect and honor for the history and stories of the book’s subjects. It’s a long read, over 500 pages, but it’s worth your time.

2. I can’t stop thinking about something I heard on a podcast a couple of days ago: Calling is where your talents and burdens collide, or: Your calling is where the world’s hunger and your deep gladness meet. It’s gotten me thinking about what those things are for me, and also what my weaknesses are. I’ve spent my whole adult life trying to figure out what my calling is, and it’s still kind of a mystery to me.

3. Funny thing about that, too: I’ve been told by a lot of people that I’d be a good teacher, which is hilarious to me because I feel like a terrible teacher. I’ve taught stuff before, and it’s always a struggle for me, and I feel like I’m rambly and impatient with my students and I’m always casting about for things to say. Maybe I would be good at it if I got more practice and did more preparation. I dunno.

4. Speaking of teaching, I’ve been thinking about what it would take to have a catechism class at my church for both kids and grownups. We’re a Baptist church, so we don’t really do confirmation or anything like that for kids, but I think it’d be helpful in spiritual formation for everybody. I’d probably have to get a guy to co-teach it with me for the sake of propriety (we’re also complementarian) (then again, if I got a married guy to do it, would we be breaking the Billy Graham rule?), but I’d be down for something like that.

5. Not much else going on for me personally. I am thinking of and praying for the family of Jordan Edwards tonight as they’re grieving for a son who lost his life unnecessarily. His siblings saw him die. His parents have lost a child. This is wrong, and I hope the officer who did it comes to repent for it.

Ekemini Uwan raised the good point that everyone’s citing his good grades and good-kid status in order to counter the narrative that these things only happen to thugs or criminals, but even the people with bad records didn’t deserve to die. Why? Because they were made in the image of God and deserved justice and grace. Any narrative that says otherwise is counter to the gospel itself.

6. Much love to all y’all. Later.

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